Do we need to install antivirus in macbook pro?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ZeroCool, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. krscu

    krscu Member

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    Yes.

    If you work in a bubble, maybe there isn't a need for AV. However, the moment you are required to receive files be it via e-mail, flash drive, messaging apps, AirDrop, etc. it pays to have added protection. Recently uninstalled Sophos and replaced it with Avast. I would say the latter is much better in terms of needed resources.
     
  2. milyonaryo

    milyonaryo New Member

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    next question is, any recommended AV that's bang for the buck?
     
  3. p.pipster

    p.pipster PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Never had AV since 2007. I guess it really depends on your computing habits and your level of comfort. For me, I'm a pretty safe browser as I don't have, uhm, niche interests. :sneaky: Also, I don't use a lot of local files anymore as almost everything is on the web. This lessens the potential of getting viruses and malware.

    I can only recall one instance where my browser was acting funny. I just did a quick search on the internet to diagnose what was going on and was able to download something free to do the cleanup. That was it.

    If you think you need it, try Malwarebytes.
     
    #63 p.pipster, Feb 10, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  4. milyonaryo

    milyonaryo New Member

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    any recommended AV?
     
  5. Edelheid

    Edelheid PhilMUG Addict Member

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    I'd highly suggest a passive a/v (only run routine scans when you feel something is wrong or off) unless you want to stare at your computer, watching the performance hits it takes from some if not all, a/v. It's highly questionable how many viruses actually get either released or rumoured by these companies attempting to push sales. Even the way anti-virus software's are now being targeted towards Macs is questionable. The important thing here is to distinguish between a true virus and malware. Macs get the latter. Perhaps the day we begin seeing worms...

    There is only one reason why a computer running macOS should have anti-virus software installed and that is to stop acting as a carrier across to a PC running Windows when sharing files, but should we sacrifice performance when the PC should be the one protecting itself? But well, sure, chivalry might not be dead just yet.

    Other than installing a/v software and seeing false positives from my experience, you can (or still should, on top of the a/v) also keep multiple backup copies of your HD so you can freely restore should you become the target of a nasty malware.

    Now as for the actual recommendations:

    https://www.malwarebytes.com/mac/

    Others:
    - Avast https://www.avast.com/mac Turn off automatic protection unless a.) you're paranoid, b.) you only surf the internet, then you probably won't notice the performance hit even if it's supposedly eating up 95% of your resources upon downloading gigabytes worth of files, or c.) you work regularly with Windows computers — because Macs are carriers. But then again Windows, to begin with, should be capable of deterring such degree of attacks...
    - Virus Scanner Plus https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/virus-scanner-plus/id595374522
     
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  6. Edelheid

    Edelheid PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Whoops! It turns out I forgot to mention these apps in my previous post. Since I am unable to edit it, here goes...

    Disclaimer: I don't work for any of these companies, I simply have been using them for a long time and can vouch for their worth. Also, know first that these are mostly paid apps. In the world of modern apps, having paid software from reputable sources also mean that they have no reason to ever stab you in the back and sell you out. Any respectable software company needs a way to help keep them alive through monetary means if they're not going to use your personal information to cover the costs and any good software is worth paying for.

    They're not exactly anti-virus software, but rather privacy tools. Security can go a long way with a stretch of effort. They can also, to a certain extent, aid in keeping your computer free from risks. They do complement your anti-virus software of choice.

    1. Little Snitch - An advanced firewall that gives you every bit of control over the connections that goes in and out of your computer. This essentially prevents any and all apps from phoning home. An app you have downloaded may actually be phoning your details back to the developer's servers without your prior knowledge. Little Snitch prevents any app from phoning home (through alerts) without your permission.

    Micro Snitch, another security software by the creators of Little Snitch, have also developed an app that alerts you each time your webcam or microphone is turned on. You don't necessarily have to cover your webcam or microphone with tape. Granted, anybody who managed to break into your computer, in theory, can bypass not only the indicator LED (the green light alert that you see when the webcam is turned on) of your webcam but also these security tools. Find solace in the fact, however, that you have to be a relatively high profile target to be exposed to any of that danger. If you fall into that category, then you probably wouldn't be reading this post of mine. If you want an all-in solution that not only covers your webcam and microphone, turn to my second recommendation that is Little Flocker.

    2. Little Flocker - You can think of this as Little Snitch for your files and the best part is this plays nicely with the other mentioned tools in this post. Little Flocker helps keep your personal data safe from malware, trojans, backdoors, misbehaving applications, and other threats by preventing any application from accessing your files and other resources on your machine (e.g., webcam and microphone) without your explicit knowledge or permission. So if you're concerned about spyware, ransomware, or if you're working in a field as an activist, journalist, government worker, lawyer, doctor, among many others, where there is no room for intruders or even just an average folk who wants basic privacy, this is a must have.

    One of the worst parts about being compromised is not knowing you’re compromised. In hindsight, you probably give little care for infections that do nothing to your resources but trust me, it can be much worse for someone else to have information that can be used against you. You may think you have nothing to hide, but really, you don't have to be a criminal to want basic privacy. I'm certain those who think they have nothing to hide, actually do have one but with the sea of information we consume and share every day they get lost in the noise.

    3. Better (Adblock for Safari) - It uses the same content blocking method, but this app is more of a way to stop companies on the web from tracking you. This is perfect if you ever wished your adblocker didn't stop you from supporting your favourite sites that gets their ads from respectable ad companies (e.g., The Deck) that don't actually abuse your privacy and data. But if you're insistent on nuking every advertisement you see, look at uBlock Origin instead.
     
    #66 Edelheid, Mar 18, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
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  7. Edelheid

    Edelheid PhilMUG Addict Member

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    For computers struck with the MacKeeper plague, there's another way to get rid of it. I've been using FaskTasks 2 to clean various MacBooks held hostage by this garbage that just refuses to die, and while at its essence is a troubleshooting app, part of its duty is to rid your computer of any traces sharing roots to MacKeeper. If my memory serves me right, this is an effort by the creators of DetectX. DetectX is also a tool specifically designed to remove MacKeeper and its cronies. I'm thinking many must have heard (or used) of it by now, but if you still haven't then you should first check out DetectX.

    Along with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Mac, this is another super useful tool to keep on your computer.

    https://sqwarq.com/fasttasks-2/

    FastTasks 2 is free for home use.
     
    #67 Edelheid, Apr 23, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
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