Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

Discussion in 'General OT' started by imart, Jan 28, 2020.

  1. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Large Israeli study shows Pfizer's vaccine cuts symptomatic COVID-19 by 94 percent

    Peter Weber
    Tue, February 16, 2021, 6:43 AM
    Israeli study finds Pfizer vaccine 95% effective against COVID-19 (yahoo.com)

    [​IMG]
    Israel has now fully vaccinated 28 percent of its population against COVID-19 and administered the first dose to 42 percent of its nine million inhabitants, and its data is very promising. Clalit, the largest of Israel's four health-care providers, reported Sunday that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine has resulted in a 94 percent drop in symptomatic COVID-19 infections among those who have gotten both doses and a 92 percent decline in severe illness.

    Clalit compared 600,000 Israelis who have been fully vaccinated against an equal number who have not, pairing vaccinated people and non-vaccinated people with a similar age and health profile. The majority of people studied were age 16 to 59, but 170,000 of the 600,000 Israelis were 60 or older. "It is now unequivocal that Pfizer's vaccine against the coronavirus is incredibly effective in real life one week after the second dose, just as was found in the clinical study," Ran Balicer, Clalit's chief innovation officer and one of the study's authors, said in a statement Sunday. He said the vaccine is even more effective two weeks after the second shot.

    Israel plans to inoculate most of its population by March, and in return for its early access to the Pfizer vaccine, the country agreed to share its data on vaccine safety, effectiveness, and side effects, The Wall Street Journal reports.

    Overall, COVID-19 cases have dropped by 41 percent in Israel while hospitalizations have dropped by a third, public health experts Ezekiel Emanuel, Céline Gounder, Michael Osterholm, Luciana Borio, Atul Gawande, and Rick Bright write in a USA Today op-ed. "All seven COVID-19 vaccines that have completed large efficacy trials" appear "to be 100 percent effective for serious complications" and death, they added, so "our advice is simple: Take whatever vaccine is offered to you. Right now, all of the vaccines are the 'best.'"

    Israeli study finds Pfizer vaccine 95% effective against COVID-19 (yahoo.com)
     
  2. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    A genetic advantage inherited from Neanderthals could give some people a 22% lower risk of severe COVID-19
    Aria Bendix
    Thu, February 18, 2021, 12:24 PM
    A genetic advantage inherited from Neanderthals could give some people a 22% lower risk of severe COVID-19 (yahoo.com)
    [​IMG]
    A model of a Neanderthal male in his twenties on display at the Natural History Museum in London in September 2014. Will Oliver/PA Images/Getty
    • Some people may have genes inherited from Neanderthals that reduce their risk of severe COVID-19 by 22%, a study found.

    • But the same researchers previously found that Neanderthal DNA can also put people at higher risk of respiratory failure due to COVID-19.

    • The inherited genes are more common in Europe and Asia.
    As an emergency room doctor, Hugo Zeberg has seen first-hand how widely COVID-19 infections can vary in severity. So he started digging for answers in a place that was familiar to him: the genome of Neanderthals.

    Zeberg works at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and for the last couple of years, has been studying the degree to which Neanderthals - an extinct human species that died out about 40,000 years ago - passed along genes to modern humans through interbreeding.

    Scientists think Neanderthal DNA makes up 1% to 2% of the genomes of many people of European and Asian descent. That small fraction of people's genetic codes may hold important clues about our immune responses to pathogens.

    In a study published this week, Zeberg and his colleague Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology suggest that some people may have inherited a genetic advantage that reduces their risk of getting severe COVID-19 by 22%.

    The advantage comes from a single haplotype - or long block of DNA - on chromosome 12. The same haplotype has been shown to protect people against West Nile, hepatitis C, and SARS (another coronavirus that shares many genetic similarities with the new one, SARS-CoV-2).

    "The protective effect of this haplotype is probably not unique to SARS-CoV-2, but a more general part of our immune system," Zeberg told Insider.

    Some Neanderthal genes are helpful, others are harmful
    [​IMG]
    An artistic representation of a Neanderthal male at the Neanderthal Museum in the Croatian town of Krapina. Reuters
    Zeberg and Pääbo found that the Neanderthal-inherited haplotype may have become more common among humans in the last 1,000 years. One possible explanation for this, Zeberg said, is the genes' role in protecting people against other diseases caused by RNA viruses.


    Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting.

    A genetic advantage inherited from Neanderthals could give some people a 22% lower risk of severe COVID-19 (yahoo.com)
     
  3. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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  4. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Single-dose of Pfizer, Moderna COVID vaccine nearly as effective as two: study
    By Laura Italiano
    February 18, 2021 | 1:17pm | Updated
    Single Pfizer, Moderna vaccine dose nearly as effective as two (nypost.com)

    Single doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are more than 92 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 illness after two weeks, Canadian researchers are now saying.

    The FDA’s own data show that a single shot of the BioNTech-Pfizer vaccine is 92.6 percent effective after two weeks, and a single Moderna jab is 92.1 percent effective, the researchers note in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Getting that second shot of Pfizer’s vaccine hikes the efficacy only marginally, to 94 percent, according to a separate study based on real-world data from Israel’s vaccination program.

    And so the prescribed second doses should be given instead to those in priority groups who are still waiting for their first shot, “given the current vaccine shortage,” the researchers urge.

    “With such a highly protective first dose, the benefits derived from a scarce supply of vaccine could be maximized by deferring second doses until all priority group members are offered at least one dose,” the researchers say in a letter to the NEJM editors.

    “There may be uncertainty about the duration of protection with a single dose,” the researchers said.

    “But the administration of a second dose within 1 month after the first, as recommended, provides little added benefit in the short term, while high-risk persons who could have received a first dose with that vaccine supply are left completely unprotected.”

    The letter was written by Dr. Danuta M. Skowronski of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control in Vancouver and Dr. Gaston De Serres of the Institut National de Sante Publique du Quebec in Quebec City.

    In a letter to NEJM responding to the two researchers, Pfizer stressed that “alternative dosing regimens” still need to be evaluated.

    Single Pfizer, Moderna vaccine dose nearly as effective as two (nypost.com)
     
  5. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Johnson & Johnson vaccine could be two doses: White House adviser
    By Jackie Salo
    February 18, 2021 | 12:27pm | Updated
    Johnson & Johnson vaccine may be 2 doses: White House adviser (nypost.com)

    Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine could end up being a two-dose regimen if it proves to offer more protection than one, a White House adviser said Thursday.

    “Johnson & Johnson is currently evaluating how their vaccine performs with two doses — in other words, their own booster,” Andy Slavitt, a senior adviser to the COVID-19 response team, said in an interview on Washington Post Live.

    “Pending the results of that, pending what the FDA has to say if the vaccine is approved in the first place, there may be a second shot of Johnson & Johnson.”

    The drugmaker announced a large-scale trial to test the two-dose regimen in November.

    The company said it planned to enroll as many as 60,000 participants worldwide for the study, which was run parallel with a one-dose trial.

    The participants are given either a placebo or the experimental shot, currently called Ad26COV2, followed by a second dose or placebo 57 days later.

    “The study will assess efficacy of the investigational vaccine after both the first and second dose to evaluate protection against the virus and potential incremental benefits for duration of protection with a second dose,” J&J said in a statement.

    The company has already filed for emergency authorization of its one-dose COVID-19 vaccine, which has shown to be 66 percent effective against moderate to severe cases.

    If it is approved by the Food and Drug Administration, it will have to go head-to-head with two-dose rivals Pfizer and Moderna, both of which offer more than 90 percent efficacy.

    With Post wires

    Johnson & Johnson vaccine may be 2 doses: White House adviser (nypost.com)
     
    #2505 Sir iAco, Feb 19, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2021
  6. king64

    king64 Active Member

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    In the meantime, while waiting for vaccines to arrive what we need is a PS5 czar asap.
     
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  7. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    8 Things to Know Before Your Second COVID-19 Vaccine
    Understand the do's and don'ts of the two-dose coronavirus vaccination regimen
    by Michelle Crouch, AARP, February 17, 2021
    8 Things to Know Before Your Second COVID-19 Vaccine (aarp.org)

    En español | If you've already received your first dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine, congratulations — you're well on your way to being protected from the coronavirus. But to be fully immunized, it's critical to get that second shot.

    Across the country, some people are running into snafus as they try to get their second dose. Winter storms have shut down clinics in some areas, while others have closed because they temporarily ran out of vaccine. There are also scattered reports of scheduling glitches.

    For the latest coronavirus news and advice go to AARP.org/coronavirus.

    If you've had an appointment canceled, don't wait for someone to call you — be proactive about rescheduling your second shot, advises William Schaffner, M.D., an infectious diseases specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, and medical director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.

    "We have told everyone these vaccines are 95 percent effective,” he says of the two-dose Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines currently in use in the U.S. “But they're only 95 percent effective if you indeed get that second dose."

    Here are a few more things to know about the second dose:

    1. Your side effects will likely be stronger
    Many people who had little to no reaction to the first vaccine dose are reporting that the second one packs a punch — surprising even those who study vaccines for a living.

    Greg Poland, M.D., an infectious disease expert at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and director of Mayo's vaccine research group, had only mild symptoms after his first dose. But the second one left him shaking — literally — with chills and a temperature of 101.

    "I took one Tylenol and went to bed and woke up the next morning 90 percent improved, and by midday I was back to normal,” Poland says. “This is not an indication of something going wrong; it is an indication of a vigorous immune response.”

    There is no live virus in the vaccine, so you can't get COVID-19 from being vaccinated.

    Participants in clinical trials of both vaccines had experiences similar to Poland's. In Pfizer's clinical trial, for instance, 31 percent of participants ages 18 to 55 reported a fever after the second dose, compared to only 8 percent after the first one. Fatigue, chills, headache and muscle/joint pain were also more common after the second injection for both vaccines.

    The good news is, older adults were less likely to experience vaccine reactions, the data shows. Among those age 55 and up in the Pfizer trial, 22 percent experienced fever after the second dose, and 3 percent had a temperature after the first dose.

    Schaffner recommends not making any big plans for the day after your scheduled vaccine appointment.

    2. You should avoid taking pain relievers before your shot
    If you've been hearing stories about second-dose side effects, you may be tempted to take a pain reliever before your appointment.

    That's not a good idea, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), unless you've been advised to do so by your doctor. Pain relievers taken preemptively ahead of a shot could dampen the effectiveness of the vaccine, Poland and Schaffner say.

    However, it's OK to take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug like Advil or Motrin after your vaccine to treat side effects such as pain, fever, chills or headache.

    3. The timing between doses doesn't need to be exact
    The second dose of the Pfizer shot is supposed to be given 21 days after the first; for Moderna, the recommended interval between doses is 28 days.

    However, if you can't get an appointment on the exact day — or if you have to miss your scheduled appointment for some reason — the CDC does allow some wiggle room. Although the agency recommends trying to stick to the suggested interval, it says the second dose can be given up to six weeks after the first.

    If your appointment is scheduled earlier than the recommended date, ask for a later appointment, Schaffner advises. “Your immune response will work perfectly well if you take more time,” he says. “But if you do it too early, the second dose may not invoke an optimal response.”

    4. Your second dose should be from the same manufacturer as your first
    Doctors are already hearing from patients asking if they can get their second dose from a different manufacturer, often because they realize the other type of vaccine is offered at a location that's more convenient. But the CDC recommends against it: The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines “are not interchangeable with each other or with other COVID-19 vaccine products,” the CDC says. “The safety and efficacy of a mixed-product series have not been evaluated.”

    The CDC does allow the mixing of Pfizer and Moderna shots in “exceptional situations,” such as when the vaccine used for someone's first dose is no longer available due to a supply shortage, or if it's unclear which vaccine they got for their first dose.

    5. A rash at the injection site isn't a reason to skip your second dose
    If you experienced a rash at the injection site three to 10 days after getting your first shot, that doesn't preclude you from getting your second shot, the CDC says, although it recommends getting it in the other arm.

    A small number of people have developed such rashes, sometimes called “COVID arm,” after vaccination. Doctors say it's likely a mild allergic reaction that can be treated with an over-the-counter antihistamine such as Benadryl.

    In guidance released Feb. 10, the CDC says the reaction is not believed to represent a risk for a more severe allergic reaction when you get your second dose.

    6. You should temporarily avoid all other vaccines
    It might be time for your shingles or Tdap vaccine, but you should hold off if you are between COVID-19 vaccine doses. Because there's no data on the safety and efficacy of COVID vaccines administered at the same time as other vaccines, the CDC recommends avoiding other immunizations in the two weeks before and after both doses. Holding off also helps prevent confusion about the cause of a reaction if you experience one.

    The CDC does allow exceptions in circumstances where avoiding the vaccine would put you at risk, such as a tetanus shot after a wound or a hepatitis shot during an outbreak.

    7. Full immunity is not immediate
    It takes two weeks after your second dose for your body to build full protection to the virus. After that, you should have almost zero chance of developing severe disease if you are exposed to someone with COVID-19, Schaffner says. The CDC also says you no longer have to quarantine if you're exposed to someone with COVID-19 — as long as you meet these criteria: you don't have symptoms and it hasn't been more than three months since your second vaccine dose.

    One possible exception is immunocompromised people, Schaffner says. They will get some level of immunity, he says, “but they may not reach the 95 percent because their immune system is already somewhat compromised, no matter how strong these vaccines are.”

    8. You still need to wear a mask
    Experts are divided about whether it's OK to hug your grandchild or gather socially with other vaccinated people after you're fully immunized.

    But they agree you should continue to wear a mask and practice social distancing in public. For one thing, there's a small chance you could get sick even after you've been vaccinated.

    In addition, it's possible that you could still carry the virus and silently transmit it to others who haven't been vaccinated, even if you don't develop symptoms.
     
  8. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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  9. ransom

    ransom PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Almost exactly one year ago a number of people, including certain members of this forum, were poking fun at those who were worried about this virus and taking precautions such as wearing masks and staying at home.
     
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  10. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Mm...from a few cases and a few deaths about a year ago to this:

    AEDBB632-93D1-496A-8643-157576F7FA74.png

    And humanity is still not out of the woods. Beyond the human toll and suffering, the global economy has been swiftly devastated with tens of millions jobless and closed businesses. Tourism is non-existent. Every corner of the world has been affected by Covid-19.
     
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  11. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Vaccine Alarmism
    And what else you need to know today.
    By David Leonhardt
    Vaccine Alarmism - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

    We look at the costs of vaccine alarmism.
    Image[​IMG]
    A vaccination site in Connecticut.Credit...Christopher Capozziello for The New York Times
    If you’re a regular reader of this newsletter, you’re probably familiar with the idea of vaccine alarmism. It goes something like this:

    The coronavirus vaccines aren’t 100 percent effective. Vaccinated people may still be contagious. And the virus variants may make everything worse. So don’t change your behavior even if you get a shot.

    Much of this message has some basis in truth, but it is fundamentally misleading. The evidence so far suggests that a full dose of the vaccine — with the appropriate waiting period after the second shot — effectively eliminates the risk of Covid-19 death, nearly eliminates the risk of hospitalization and drastically reduces a person’s ability to infect somebody else. All of that is also true about the virus’s new variants.

    Yet the alarmism continues. And now we are seeing its real-world costs: Many people don’t want to get the vaccine partly because it sounds so ineffectual.

    About one-third of members of the U.S. military have declined vaccine shots. When shots first became available to Ohio nursing-home workers, about 60 percent said no. Some N.B.A. stars are wary of appearing in public-services ads encouraging vaccination.

    Nationwide, nearly half of Americans would refuse a shot if offered one immediately, polls suggest. Vaccination skepticism is even higher among Black and Hispanic people, white people without a college degree, registered Republicans and lower-income households.

    Kate Grabowski, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins, told me that she has heard from relatives about their friends and co-workers choosing not to get a shot because they keep hearing they can still get Covid and pass it on to others — and will still need to wear masks and social distance. “What’s the point?” she said, describing their attitude.

    The message from experts, Grabowski said, is “being misinterpreted. That’s on us. We’re clearly doing something wrong.”

    “Our discussion about vaccines has been poor, really poor,” Dr. Muge Cevik, a virologist, told me. “As scientists we need to be more careful what we say and how that could be understood by the public.”
    [​IMG]
    An 83-year-old woman receives a vaccination in Idaho this month.Credit...Janie Osborne for The New York Times
    The cost of confusion
    Many academic experts — and, yes, journalists too — are instinctively skeptical and cautious. This instinct has caused the public messaging about vaccines to emphasize uncertainty and potential future bad news.

    To take one example: The initial research trials of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines did not study whether a vaccinated person could get infected and infect another person. But the accumulated scientific evidence suggests the chances are very small that a vaccinated person could infect someone else with a severe case of Covid. (A mild case is effectively the common cold.) You wouldn’t know that from much of the public discussion.

    “Over and over again, I see statements that in theory one could be infected and spread the virus even after being fully vaccinated,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota told me. “Is the ambiguous messaging contributing to ambivalent feelings about vaccination? Yes, no question.”

    The messaging, as Dr. Abraar Karan of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston said, has a “somewhat paternalistic” quality. It’s as if many experts do not trust people to understand both that the vaccines make an enormous difference and that there are unanswered questions.

    As a result, the public messages err on the side of alarmism: The vaccine is not a get-out-of-Covid-free card!

    In their own lives, medical experts — and, again, journalists — tend to be cleareyed about the vaccines. Many are getting shots as soon as they’re offered one. They are urging their family and friends to do the same. But when they speak to a national audience, they deliver a message that comes off very differently. It is dominated by talk of risks, uncertainties, caveats and possible problems. It feeds pre-existing anti-vaccine misinformation and anxiety.

    No wonder that the experts’ own communities (which are disproportionately white, upper-income and liberal) are less skeptical of the vaccines than Black, Latino, working class and conservative communities.

    Over the next several weeks, the supply of available vaccines will surge. If large numbers of Americans say no to a shot, however, many will suffer needlessly. “It makes me sad,” Grabowski told me. “We’ve created this amazing technology, and we can save so many lives.”

    What should the public messaging about the vaccines be? “They’re safe. They’re highly effective against serious disease. And the emerging evidence about infectiousness looks really good,” Grabowski said. “If you have access to a vaccine and you’re eligible, you should get it.”

    Virus developments:

     
  12. yoh_hectic

    yoh_hectic PhilMUG Addict Member

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    That does not include deaths within the 50 week period that was caused by persons delaying medical treatment out of fear of getting infected by COVID-19 from healthcare professionals and their workplaces.

    I know 12 people who died from non-communicable diseases like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and kidney failure.
     
  13. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    A COVID-19 long-hauler details his year of 'hell'
    Ed Hornick
    ·Senior Editor
    Fri, February 19, 2021, 4:53 PM
    A COVID-19 long-hauler details his year of 'hell' (yahoo.com)

    Yahoo News senior editor Ed Hornick has been fighting the lingering symptoms of COVID-19 for over 10 months now. Here, he shares his story.

    I circled Jan. 23 on my calendar this year, noting in the box: “Coronavirus Hell Anniversary.” It sounds like Stephen King's next novel — but it’s actually the one-year anniversary of the chilly, damp day I walked into a London hospital with all the telltale symptoms of COVID-19 — only I didn’t know that yet. I would later be diagnosed instead with a viral chest infection and pericarditis (inflammation of the lining around the heart). Coronavirus was barely on the public’s radar at the time.

    I was released hours later and told I'd be back to normal within two weeks. But instead, a year later, I'm at the center of a medical mystery that has stumped experts and left me with agonizing chronic pain, relentless fatigue, terrifying “brain fog” and an underlying fear that I may never get better. What if this is as good as it gets for me? I'm only 40 years old.

    I am hardly alone. While there are no exact figures on how many people around the world are suffering from what is currently being called long COVID syndrome or post-acute COVID syndrome, some estimates put the number in the millions. Self-described “long-haulers” like myself have banded together, though, by forming online support groups and joining social media spaces in an effort to get answers.

    Meanwhile, more post-COVID recovery centers are opening across the country, where patients can gain access to groundbreaking research and treatments. Unfortunately, COVID-positive or antibody-positive test results are required for admission to most if not all of these programs. Due to the lack of access to coronavirus tests early on in the pandemic, many long-haulers simply do not have any proof that they were sick with the virus, other than hospital discharge papers and doctor’s notes with the phrase “suspected coronavirus” written on them.

    In the past year, I’ve made multiple trips to the emergency room, undergone medical procedures, taken inaccurate coronavirus tests, faced “gaslighting” by doctors, had medications stop working properly, struggled to maintain a normal working day, moved back to the U.S. so I could have help with daily life and better access to health care, and simply tried to understand why diagnostic tests were not picking up the ailments I was experiencing. I wrote about that journey in September.

    "I feel like I’m being tortured"
    Since that time, my condition remains at Status: Baffling. I have abnormal heart, gastrointestinal, and kidney functioning. I sleep with oxygen. Daily debilitating migraine headaches seem to be at a pain level 12; a noticeable tremor in my left hand comes and goes, and my leg muscles twitch uncontrollably. I get so dizzy from standing up that I nearly pass out. I’m often hit with a sense of jamais vu, the big sister of deja vu. I forget friends’ names and often repeat the same story in a conversation. “Are you having a ‘Golden Girls’ senior moment?” one of my friends jokingly asked me during one of the repeat-story performances. “Ugh, it’s this damn brain fog —I’m so sorry,” I replied.

    Officially, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists over a dozen symptoms. But talk to any long-hauler and you’ll find there are many more conditions, including hair loss, insomnia, gastrointestinal disorders, anosmia (loss of smell), phantosmia (phantom smells), mood swings, and rashes. Cognitive impact and profound fatigue, though, have been especially common for most long-haulers, who are now speaking out in greater numbers.

    “I forgot my partner’s name,” artist Hannah Davis, 32, tells the New York Times. “I would regularly pick up a hot pan, burn myself, put it down and literally do it again. I forgot how to shower. I forgot how to dress myself. … I feel like I am basically on a 48-hour memory cycle.”

    Air Force reservist Rick Dressler, 52, says just getting up is “absolutely frustrating,” telling the Baltimore Sun that when he wakes up, “the first thing I think is when can I go back to bed, which is utterly ridiculous.”

    Miel Singletary Schultz, a 48-year-old woman from California, offers this bleak assessment in an interview with The New Republic: Long COVID syndrome is “so devastating, it’s had me on my knees begging God to let me die. I feel like I’m being tortured, or going through a long and terribly painful transition into something else.”

    Overlapping Symptoms Mimic Other Disorders
    For doctors who specialize in treating long COVID patients, life is equally as frustrating.

    “Many of the patients are hitting their one-year mark in the upcoming three or four months,” says Dr. Zijian Chen, medical director of the Center for Post COVID Care at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City. “So it just beckons the question: When is this going to end?”

    I spoke to Dr. Chen back in August, and then again in early February, to get a sense of how the diagnostics, treatments and research were progressing.

    “I think the biggest thing we are learning is really how to look at a patient and use the standard way of evaluating patients and that way we can put them into the diagnostic protocols that we have,” Chen says. “And then from there, look at what we need to do for each patient in regards to kind of treatment and rehabilitation.”

    One of the challenges for doctors, he adds, is trying to determine what is COVID-19-related and what are separate issues.

    “What we’ve noticed is that there are a lot of patients who have symptoms and they just attribute it to COVID even though it may not be there — and that’s really hard to distinguish.”

    Dr. Alfonso Hernandez-Romieu, a member of the CDC’s COVID-19 response team, refers to long COVID as “nebulous” because “it can overlap with other complications of COVID-19 illness, such as hospitalization complications and post-intensive care syndrome, or even multisystem inflammatory disorder.”

    Doctors have seen striking similarities between the symptoms of long COVID and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) — though they caution that further research is needed.

    For its part, the CDC says in a blurb on its website that it is working to better understand long COVID and ME/CFS.

    But doctors like Anthony Komaroff, a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, expect to see “an increase that could generate as many new [ME/CFS] cases over the next two to three years as exist already in the U.S.”

    The medical community also sees parallels between long COVID and other viral illnesses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and Ebola.

    PLEASE continue reading.
    .A COVID-19 long-hauler details his year of 'hell' (yahoo.com)
     
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  14. Pupkin

    Pupkin Well-Known Member

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    Progress.
    Screenshot_20210222-144810.png
     
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  15. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    China’s Sinovac Covid-19 vaccine gets emergency use authorization | Inquirer

    ***
    I really hope these vaccines arrive this month so the Gov't can at least starting vaccinating someone (or anyone)!

    We are so late its already embarrassing!

    Malaysia already received their vaccines yesterday, even Myanmar and Bangladesh have started vaccination!
    I don't think its still an issue of which country is richer!
     
    Sir iAco and raypin like this.
  16. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    mmm....incompetence.
     
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  17. ransom

    ransom PhilMUG Addict Member

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    I actually wish it was just incompetence. Smells more like corruption each passing day we still don't have the vaccine.
     
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  18. Nisroc88

    Nisroc88 Active Member

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    Definitely corruption — remember that initially Sinovac was priced like how many thousand pesos until it was shown that the others were just hundred pesos then DOH suddenly reversed and said Sinovac costs just as much as the others.

    Any deals this government does with China is full of vested interests.
     
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  19. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Glasses wearers 2-to-3 times less likely to get COVID-19, study says
    By Yaron Steinbuch
    February 22, 2021 | 9:51am | Updated
    People who wear glasses are less likely to catch COVID-19: study (nypost.com)
    [​IMG]
    Getty Images/iStockphoto

    People who wear glasses are two-to-three times less likely to get infected with COVID-19, a new study has found.

    Indian researchers studied 304 patients whose glasses-wearing habits were examined through a questionnaire and compared with existing studies of the general population, according to research published in medRxiv, which is not peer-reviewed.

    “This present study showed that the risk of COVID was two to three times less in spectacles-wearing population than the population not using spectacles,” Amit Kumar Saxena said in the findings, the UK’s Mirror reported.

    “Protective role of the spectacles was found statistically significant, if those were used for (a) long period of the day,” he added. “Touching and rubbing of the eyes with contaminated hands may be a significant route of infection.”

    The researchers said people touch their face on average 23 times an hour and the eyes on average three times per hour.

    “Touching one’s nose and mouth is significantly reduced when wearing a face mask properly. But wearing a face mask does not protect the eyes,” the study said.

    “The nasolacrimal duct may be a route of virus transmission from conjunctival sac to the nasopharynx,” according to the study.

    According to the authors, a total of 58 patients wore glasses continuously during the day and during outdoor activities.

    New York Post (nypost.com)
    People who wear glasses are less likely to catch COVID-19: study (nypost.com)
     

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