Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

Discussion in 'General OT' started by imart, Jan 28, 2020.

  1. DON2003

    DON2003 Well-Known Member

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    always the blame is when something bad happens,
    ika nga sisi ang nasa huli
     
  2. Godfather

    Godfather PhilMUG Addict Member

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    GCQ forever but still no solid vaccine plan. The only good news I could find for our third world was this:

    5.6M vaccine doses expected within first quarter

    And that's with fingers crossed. There are about 110 million of us.

    Anyway, 5.5 million of those are Astra Zeneca, which as I heard from experts Heather Heying and Bret Weinstein today (on Real Time with Bill Maher), may be the safer vaccine simply because they are adenovirus based like traditional vaccines. See at 1:51 below.



    The MrNAs like Pfizer and Moderna are shiny and new, but there's really so much we don't know about it due to its extreme new-ness.
     
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  3. jetan

    jetan PhilMUG Addict Member

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    since when? i recalled were in GCQ from Sept 2020 till Jan 2021.
     
  4. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Why Some Who Are Vaccinated Still Get Coronavirus

    Why Some Who Are Vaccinated Still Get Coronavirus - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

    The scattered reports from around the country can play like a cruel irony: Someone tests positive for the coronavirus even though they have already received one or both doses of a Covid-19 vaccine.

    Notable examples
    It’s happened to at least three members of Congress recently:
    But it’s been reported in people in other walks of life too, including Rick Pitino, a Hall of Fame basketball coach, and a nurse in California.

    How can that happen?
    Experts say cases like these are not surprising and do not indicate that there was something wrong with the vaccines or how they were administered. Here is why.

    • Vaccines don’t work instantly. It takes a few weeks for the body to build up immunity after receiving a dose. And the vaccines now in use in the U.S., from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, both require a second shot a few weeks after the first to reach full effectiveness.

    • Nor do they work retroactively. You can already be infected and not know it when you get the vaccine — even if you recently tested negative. That infection can continue to develop after you get the shot but before its protection fully takes hold, and then show up in a positive test result.

    • The vaccines prevent illness, but maybe not infection. Covid vaccines are being authorized based on how well they keep you from getting sick, needing hospitalization and dying. Scientists don’t know yet how effective the vaccines are at preventing the coronavirus from infecting you to begin with, or at keeping you from passing it on to others. (That’s why vaccinated people should keep wearing masks and maintaining social distance.)

    • Even the best vaccines aren’t perfect. The efficacy rates for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are extremely high, but they are not 100 percent. With the virus still spreading out of control in the U.S., some of the millions of recently vaccinated people were bound to get infected in any case.
    Why Some Who Are Vaccinated Still Get Coronavirus - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
    Lucy Tompkins reports on national news. She is from Bozeman, Mont., and is based in New York. @lucytompkins2
     
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  5. potpot2

    potpot2 PhilMUG Addict Member

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    we have never been in MGCQ
     
  6. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Good Vaccine News
    And what else you need to know today.
    By David Leonhardt
    Good Vaccine News - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

    Good morning. The vaccine news continues to be better than many people realize.

    [​IMG]
    A nurse prepared a dose of the Moderna vaccine in the Bronx on Saturday.James Estrin/The New York Times
    Infections aren’t what matters
    The news about the vaccines continues to be excellent — and the public discussion of it continues to be more negative than the facts warrant.

    Here’s the key fact: All five vaccines with public results have eliminated Covid-19 deaths. They have also drastically reduced hospitalizations. “They’re all good trial results,” Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. “It’s great news.”

    Many people are instead focusing on relatively minor differences among the vaccine results and wrongly assuming that those differences mean that some vaccines won’t prevent serious illnesses. It’s still too early to be sure, because a few of the vaccine makers have released only a small amount of data. But the available data is very encouraging — including about the vaccines’ effect on the virus’s variants.

    “The vaccines are poised to deliver what people so desperately want: an end, however protracted, to this pandemic,” as Julia Marcus of Harvard Medical School recently wrote in The Atlantic.

    Why is the public understanding more negative than it should be? Much of the confusion revolves around the meaning of the word “effective.”

    What do we care about?
    In the official language of research science, a vaccine is typically considered effective only if it prevents people from coming down with any degree of illness. With a disease that’s always or usually horrible, like ebola or rabies, that definition is also the most meaningful one.

    But it’s not the most meaningful definition for most coronavirus infections.

    Whether you realize it or not, you have almost certainly had a coronavirus. Coronaviruses have been circulating for decades if not centuries, and they’re often mild. The common cold can be a coronavirus. The world isn’t going to eliminate coronaviruses — or this particular one, known as SARS-CoV-2 — anytime soon.

    Yet we don’t need to eliminate it for life to return to normal. We instead need to downgrade it from a deadly pandemic to a normal virus. Once that happens, adults can go back to work, and children back to school. Grandparents can nuzzle their grandchildren, and you can meet your friends at a restaurant.

    As Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, told me this weekend: “I don’t actually care about infections. I care about hospitalizations and deaths and long-term complications.”

    The data
    By those measures, all five of the vaccines — from Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax and Johnson & Johnson — look extremely good. Of the roughly 75,000 people who have received one of the five in a research trial, not a single person has died from Covid, and only a few people appear to have been hospitalized. None have remained hospitalized 28 days after receiving a shot.

    To put that in perspective, it helps to think about what Covid has done so far to a representative group of 75,000 American adults: It has killed roughly 150 of them and sent several hundred more to the hospital. The vaccines reduce those numbers to zero and nearly zero, based on the research trials.

    Zero isn’t even the most relevant benchmark. A typical U.S. flu season kills between five and 15 out of every 75,000 adults and hospitalizes more than 100 of them.

    I assume you would agree that any vaccine that transforms Covid into something much milder than a typical flu deserves to be called effective. But that is not the scientific definition. When you read that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 66 percent effective or that the Novavax vaccine was 89 percent effective, those numbers are referring to the prevention of all illness. They count mild symptoms as a failure.

    “In terms of the severe outcomes, which is what we really care about, the news is fantastic,” Dr. Aaron Richterman, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, said.

    The variants
    What about the highly contagious new virus variants that have emerged in Britain, Brazil and South Africa? The South African variant does appear to make the vaccines less effective at eliminating infections.

    Fortunately, there is no evidence yet that it increases deaths among vaccinated people. Two of the five vaccines — from Johnson & Johnson and Novavax — have reported some results from South Africa, and none of the people there who received a vaccine died of Covid. “People are still not getting serious illness. They’re still not dying,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health told me.

    The most likely reason, epidemiologists say, is that the vaccines still provide considerable protection against the variant, albeit not quite as much as against the original version. Some protection appears to be enough to turn this coronavirus into a fairly normal disease in the vast majority of cases.

    “This variant is clearly making it a little tougher to get the most vigorous response that you would want to have,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said. “But still, for severe disease, it’s looking really good.”

    [​IMG]
    A vaccination site in North Charleston, S.C.Cameron Pollack for The New York Times
    What would an expert do?
    The biggest caveat is the possibility that future data will be less heartening. Johnson & Johnson and Novavax, for example, have issued press releases about their data, but no independent group has yet released an analysis. It will also be important to see much more data about how the vaccines interact with the variants.

    But don’t confuse uncertainty with bad news. The available vaccine evidence is nearly as positive as it could conceivably be. And our overly negative interpretation of it is causing real problems.

    Some people worry that schools cannot reopen even after teachers are vaccinated. Others are left with the mistaken impression that only the two vaccines with the highest official effectiveness rates — from Moderna and Pfizer — are worth getting.

    In truth, so long as the data holds up, any of the five vaccines can save your life.

    Last week, Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University told my colleague Denise Grady about a conversation he had with other experts. During it, they imagined that a close relative had to choose between getting the Johnson & Johnson vaccine now or waiting three weeks to get the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine. “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” Schaffner said. “The virus is bad. You’re risking three more weeks of exposure as opposed to getting protection tomorrow.”

    Good Vaccine News - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
     
  7. Silentwill

    Silentwill Active Member

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    As far as MM is concerned, like others said, never been MGCQ.

    There were some regions which had been or maybe still are in MGCQ, but not NCR.
     
  8. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    How The COVID-19 Vaccines Compare To Each Other

    Julia Ries
    ·On Assignment For HuffPost
    Wed, February 3, 2021, 5:45 AM
    Which vaccine should you get?
    Source:
    How The COVID-19 Vaccines Compare To Each Other (yahoo.com)

    Experts say it doesn’t really matter (and you likely won’t have a choice in most cases). Any vaccine you get should do a pretty great job at protecting you against severe illness, along with hospitalization and death.

    From an individual standpoint, a slight dip in efficacy might not make a big difference, but from a population standpoint, it can translate to a lot more people who remain susceptible to getting sick and spreading it to others, Ogbuagu said.

    All of these vaccines working together will help us achieve herd immunity. We really need 65% to 85% of the population to have protection against the virus, Ogbuagu said. And that end goal becomes a lot more realistic when we’ve got a mix of highly efficacious vaccines.

    How The COVID-19 Vaccines Compare To Each Other (yahoo.com)

    In the race to end the coronavirus pandemic, the more safe, effective vaccines we have available, the sooner we’ll be able to
    climb out of this mess.

    So far, five vaccines — produced by Moderna, Pfizer, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca — are the front-runners. In the coming months, these vaccines will not only save tons of lives, but they will also alleviate some of the overwhelming pressure on the health care system and provide our frontline workers with some much-needed rest.

    Below, where we dissect the leading vaccines, you’ll notice the shots’ efficacy levels range from 66% to 95%. While that may seem like a huge gap, it’s worth noting that comparing vaccine efficacy levels is kind of like “comparing apples to oranges,” according to Onyema Ogbuagu, an infectious disease specialist at Yale Medicine and principal investigator of Yale’s Pfizer COVID-19 trial.

    Some of these vaccines (like Johnson & Johnson’s) were tested in areas where more contagious variants have taken hold, such as South Africa, whereas Moderna’s and Pfizer’s vaccines were tested before the variants identified in the U.K. and South Africa struck and began spreading like wildfire.

    The biggest takeaway is that while the vaccines differ in how well they prevent symptomatic disease, so far nobody who has taken any of these vaccines have died or been hospitalized due to COVID-19. Preventing severe disease is something all the shots do well, so even imperfect vaccines will prove invaluable in our quest to end the pandemic.

    Here’s a basic breakdown on each of the leading COVID-19 immunization options:

    Pfizer/BioNTech

    How it works: The Pfizer shot is a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine, which essentially sends instructions to our cells that teach our immune system how to fight the coronavirus.

    Efficacy: 95% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two shots, 21 or so days apart

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: It holds up. A lab study looking at the blood of vaccinated people found the vaccine may be slightly less effective against new variants like the one discovered in South Africa, but it still protects people well. Of course, more evidence of the shot being put to the test in the real world is necessary to validate those findings.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Piece of cake. The vaccine can be changed in a couple of days, Ogbuagu said. Pfizer is already working on a booster shot against the mutations. The bigger question is what sort of testing and approval process health officials would require — that’s where there’d be delays.

    Side effects: Most people will feel pain and soreness in the arm where they get the shot. Up to half of people are expected to experience flu-like symptoms such as chills, fatigue and headaches, more so after the second dose. But that’s just the immune system doing its thing.

    How it’s stored: These mRNA vaccines are finicky, and must be stored at subzero temperatures (minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit) in freezers.

    Availability: The phase three trial was completed in winter 2020, and the vaccine is now being distributed to the public through emergency use authorization.

    Takeaway: This was the first vaccine that was approved and rolled out in United States, and the Biden administration has already purchased 100 million more doses. “At least a third of the U.S. population, roughly, will receive the dose of the Pfizer vaccine, and so definitely it will be a major contributor to curbing the epidemic here,” Ogbuagu said.

    Moderna

    How it works: Like Pfizer, Moderna’s vaccine uses mRNA technology.

    Efficacy: 94.5% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two shots, 28 or so days apart

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: The vaccine is thought to be less effective against the variant dominating in South Africa, but a lab study shows the shot can still effectively neutralize the virus and provide protection. We’ll need more data to better understand that, though.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Same quick process as Pfizer. Moderna has already kicked off development and testing of a booster shot specifically targeting the variant discovered in South Africa.

    Side effects: Again, similar to Pfizer. Most people will feel pain and soreness in the arm where they get the shot. Up to half of people are expected to experience flu-like symptoms such as chills, fatigue and headaches, more so after the second dose.

    How it’s stored: These must be carefully stored at subzero temperatures (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit) in freezers.

    Availability: The phase three trial was completed in winter 2020, and the vaccine is now being distributed to the public through emergency use authorization.

    Takeaway: The Biden administration also secured an additional 100 million doses from Moderna, so this shot will likely protect another third of the U.S. population. This puts it “on par” with the Pfizer vaccine, Ogbuagu said.

    Novavax

    Johnson & Johnson

    Oxford/AstraZeneca

    ===============================================================
    Copy and paste is limited to 1,000 characters. To read the entire article, click on the link:
    How The COVID-19 Vaccines Compare To Each Other (yahoo.com)
     
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  9. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Mm...Israel is one of the most vaccinated countries in the world. Preliminary data shows that the large scale vaccination IS EFFECTIVE. Encouraging news.

    7FBC4C7A-EB64-4743-BB99-CC9E5A9AC65A.png
     
    #2489 raypin, Feb 4, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2021
  10. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    31 Reasons Why I Won’t Take the Vaccine
    31 Reasons Why I Won’t Take the Vaccine | Gates of Vienna
    Posted on February 3, 2021 by Baron Bodissey

    The following list was created by the Israeli rabbi Chananya Weissman. Many thanks to MC for the tip.

    31. The whole thing stinks.

    Source: 31 Reasons Why I Won’t Take the Vaccine | Gates of Vienna

    This entry was posted in Civil Liberties, Cowardice, Culture Wars, Insanity, Israel, Legal action, Life in a dystopia, News, Persecution of dissidents, Plagues, Politics by Baron Bodissey. Bookmark the permalink.
     
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  11. wuyckie

    wuyckie Member

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    Rare case
     
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  12. wuyckie

    wuyckie Member

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    i agree budget is important, i believe pharmaceutical companies benefited and thanked to Obama administration.
     
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  13. wuyckie

    wuyckie Member

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    In Indonesia, the local FDA gave an approval 1 day after president Jokowi announced it must be approved in the next 2days before initial vaccination day.
    During house of representative meeting, FDA leader stated they been “pushed” and didnt be responsible if something happen. It’s all in government’s hands.
     
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  14. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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  15. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Fauci says 20K pregnant women got COVID-19 vaccine with ‘no red flags’
    By Kenneth Garger
    February 10, 2021 | 8:38pm | Updated
    Fauci says 20K pregnant women got COVID vax with 'no red flags' (nypost.com)

    Dr. Anthony Fauci on Wednesday said about 20,000 pregnant women have received the COVID-19 vaccine “with no red flags.”

    The top infectious disease expert announced the update at a Wednesday White House briefing, adding both the CDC and the FDA are monitoring the situation.

    Guidance for pregnant women receiving the coronavirus vaccine have varied as they did not participate in either Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccine trials.

    But Fauci said Wednesday that COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials for pregnant women and children are underway, with more to come.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests pregnant women discuss with their healthcare provider the decision to get vaccinated.

    The World Health Organization, however, does not recommend pregnant women receive the COVID-19 vaccine unless they are at high risk of exposure.
     
  16. wuyckie

    wuyckie Member

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  17. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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  18. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    98 Symptoms Coronavirus Patients Say They've Had
    "Long haulers" report a wide variety of painful side effects from COVID-19.
    BYKELLY HERNANDEZ
    DECEMBER 12, 2020
    FACT CHECKED BY[​IMG]ALEK KORAB
    Source: 98 Symptoms Coronavirus Patients Say They've Had | Eat This Not That

    Ever since COVID-19 reared its ugly head and upended our world, long-lasting symptoms of the virus have been varied and hard to pinpoint—until now. "A survey conducted by Dr. Natalie Lambert of Indiana University School of Medicine and Survivor Corps analyzed the long-term experiences COVID-19 survivors are having with the virus. The COVID-19 'Long Hauler' Symptoms Survey Report identified 98 long-lasting symptoms." Click through from least common to most common to see if you've experienced any. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

    98 Symptoms Coronavirus Patients Say They've Had | Eat This Not That
     
  19. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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