Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

Discussion in 'General OT' started by imart, Jan 28, 2020.

  1. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    China Wanted to Show Off Its Vaccines. It’s Backfiring.
    Delays, inconsistent data, spotty disclosures and the country’s attacks on Western rivals have marred its ambitious effort to portray itself as a leader in global health.

    By Sui-Lee Wee
    Jan. 25, 2021
    China wanted to show off its vaccines. It’s backfiring. - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
    阅读简体中文版閱讀繁體中文版

    China’s coronavirus vaccines were supposed to deliver a geopolitical win that showcased the country’s scientific prowess and generosity. Instead, in some places, they have set off a backlash.

    China’s coronavirus vaccines were supposed to deliver a geopolitical win that showcased the country’s scientific prowess and generosity. Instead, in some places, they have set offa backlash.

    Officials in Brazil and Turkey have complained that Chinese companies have been slow to ship the doses and ingredients. Disclosures about the Chinese vaccines have been spotty. The few announcements that have trickled out suggest that China’s vaccines, while considered effective, cannot stop the virus as well as those developed by Pfizer and Moderna, the American drugmakers.

    In the Philippines, some lawmakers have criticized the government’s decision to purchase a vaccine made by a Chinese company called Sinovac. Officials in Malaysia and Singapore, which ordered doses from Sinovac, have had to reassure their citizens that they would approve a vaccine only if it has been proven safe and effective.

    At least 24 countries, most of them low and middle income, signed deals with the Chinese vaccine companies because they offered access at a time when richer nations had claimed most of the doses made by Pfizer and Moderna. But the delays in getting the Chinese vaccines and the fact that the vaccines are less effective mean that those countries may take longer to vanquish the virus.

    Beijing officials who had hoped the vaccines would burnish China’s global reputation are now on the defensive. The state news media has started a misinformation campaign against the American vaccines and promoting the Chinese vaccines as a better alternative. They have also distributed online videos that have been shared by the anti-vaccine movement in the United States.

    The vaccines are also meant to prove that China has become a scientific and diplomatic powerhouse. It remains on par with the United States in the number of vaccines approved for emergency use or in late-stage trials. Sinopharm, a state-owned vaccine maker, and Sinovac have said they can produce up to a combined two billion doses this year, making them essential to the global fight against the coronavirus.

    Unlike the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, their doses can be kept at refrigerated temperatures and are more easily transported, making them appealing to the developing world.

    China’s campaign has been plagued with doubts, however. A YouGov survey this month of roughly 19,000 people in 17 countries and regions showed that most were distrustful of a Covid-19 vaccine made in China. The misinformation campaign surrounding Western vaccines could further undermine its image.

    CHINESE VACCINES
    Delays, inconsistent data, spotty disclosures and attacks on Western rivals have marred China’s ambitious effort to portray itself as a leader in global health.

    Sui-Lee Wee is a correspondent for The New York Times in the Beijing bureau. She has covered China for close to a decade and writes about social issues, gender, genetic surveillance, health care and the intersection of demographics and the economy.

    @suilee

    China wanted to show off its vaccines. It’s backfiring. - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
     
  2. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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  3. Sir iAco

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    Germany says AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine isn’t for people 65 and older
    By Lia Eustachewich
    January 28, 2021 | 9:13am | Updated
    Germany says AstraZeneca vaccine isn't for people 65 and older (nypost.com

    Enlarge Image
    [​IMG]
    The Standing Vaccine Commission said the shot should only be used on people ages 18 to 64 "based on available data."EPA

    Germany’s vaccine commission said AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine should not be used on people 65 and older due to “insufficient data” on its efficacy.

    The Standing Vaccine Commission said the shot, which is being developed with the University of Oxford, should only be used on people ages 18 to 64 “based on available data.”

    “There is currently insufficient data to assess the efficacy of the vaccine for persons aged 65 years and older,” the panel of scientific experts said.

    The recommendation follows confusion earlier this week over the efficacy of AstraZeneca’s jab in adults over 65.

    Two German newspapers, citing government sources, said the shot was found to be as low as 8 percent effective in seniors — which the UK-based company said was “completely incorrect,” German broadcaster Deutsch Welle reported Tuesday.

    “In November, we published data in The Lancet demonstrating that older adults showed strong immune responses to the vaccine, with 100% of older adults generating spike-specific antibodies after the second dose,” AstraZeneca’s spokesperson said.

    The startling statistic was also rebutted by the German Health Ministry, which suggested the leaks mixed up the 8 percent figure.

    “At first glance, it appears that two things have been confused in the reports: About 8% of the subjects in the AstraZeneca efficacy study were between 56 and 69 years of age, and only 3 to 4% were over 70 years of age,” a spokesperson said.

    “However, this does not infer an efficacy of only 8% in the elderly.”

    The European Medicines Agency is expected to decide whether to approve AstraZeneca’s vaccine on Friday.

    With Post wires

    Germany says AstraZeneca vaccine isn't for people 65 and older (nypost.com)


    SEE ALSO
    upload_2021-1-28_14-31-59.gif AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine success followed major scientific mistake
     
  4. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine success followed major scientific mistake
    By Lee Brown
    November 24, 2020 | 8:14am | Updated
    AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine success followed scientific error (nypost.com)

    AstraZeneca’s UK scientists made a major mistake during trials of its coronavirus vaccine — one that led to its most important breakthrough, the team’s lead researcher said.

    The team working with Oxford University was supposed to give volunteers two full doses of the vaccine, which proved to be around 62% effective in the group given the correct portions.

    But one group of British volunteers was initially only given a half dose by mistake — a ration that tested to be up to 90% effective when combined with a full dose at least a month later.

    “That, in essence, is how we stumbled upon” the successful combination, Mene Pangalos, the head of AstraZeneca’s non-oncology research and development, told Reuters.

    “Yes, it was a mistake.”

    joining Pfizer and Moderna, whose shots both tested up to 95% effective in trials.

    latest vaccine option is easier to distribute, however, as it only needs to be refrigerated rather than frozen like the other two.

    It is also cheaper, with AstraZeneca pledging to not make a profit on the vaccine during the pandemic, reaching agreements with governments and international health organizations that put its cost at about $2.50 a dose.

    Pfizer’s vaccine costs about $20, while Moderna’s is $15 to $25, based on agreements the companies have struck to supply their vaccines to the US government.
    With Post wires
    AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine success followed scientific error (nypost.com)
     
  5. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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  6. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Brazil researchers find people infected with 2 different coronavirus variants | Inquirer

     
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  7. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    [​IMG] Don't take painkillers before your COVID-19 shot, doctors advise
    Elizabeth Elkind

    Don't take painkillers before your COVID-19 shot, doctors advise (msn.com)

    Americans who get the COVID-19 vaccine may feel some mild side effects, health officials warn. However, doctors are urging people to avoid trying to ward them off with a preemptive dose of Tylenol, Advil or some other over-the-counter pain reliever — because it could have negative effects on the vaccine's efficacy.

    [​IMG]© Getty Images cbsn-fusion-limited-supply-of-covid-19-vaccines-by-manufacturers-has-the-european-union-threatening-to-prevent-companies-from-exporting-any-orders-until-their-own-needs-are-met-thumbnail-634087-640x360.jpg

    "My feeling on this is that certainly don't pre-treat with anti-fever medicines or anti-inflammatories," said Dr. Paul Offit, professor of pediatrics in the infectious diseases division at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists common side effects from the vaccines including fever, chills, tiredness and headache, as well as pain and swelling on the arm that got the shot. But it says these are "normal signs that your body is building protection," and should go away in a few days.

    Offit, who also advised the FDA during the COVID-19 vaccine approval process, noted two studies conducted in Australia and the Czech Republic on the effects of anti-inflammatory and fever-reducing medications in relation to other vaccines.

    "The conclusion was that pre-treatment with anti-fever medicines decreased your immune response to a variety of vaccines," he explained.

    The study in Australia, which examined the link between taking a fever-reducing medication and children's immune systems with the influenza vaccine, found that children who experienced a post-vaccination fever were better equipped immunologically to handle the virus. Depending on the viral strain, those who took a fever-reducing drug had fewer antibodies from the vaccine.

    The Czech study found that babies who were given a fever-reducing medication prior to their early childhood immunizations had antibodies that "were significantly lower" than those who had experienced higher post-vaccination fevers. The study concluded that pre-medicating "should not be routinely recommended since antibody responses to several vaccine antigens were reduced."

    Living beings develop fevers because the immune system functions better at higher temperatures, Offit said. Consequently, a fever actually encourages the body to produce antibodies "more efficiently."

    Symptoms like fever, however, "pass very quickly," according to Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

    Schaffner agreed that avoiding pre-medicating before a vaccine was "the standard recommendation," but he noted that the studies on the topic were "very, very small."

    "We don't know whether this is true generally, or even whether those diminutions in antibody response have any clinical significance whatsoever," he said. "But they've been enough to make most of us somewhat cautious about recommending pre-medication."

    After all," he added, "we do want everyone to achieve with those two doses as close to that 95% protection as we can get, right?"

    Moreover, he said, there's no real reason to medicate in advance.

    "This hasn't happened with such frequency that people have thought to pre-medicate folks, but have suggested that if people are experiencing these symptoms, to clearly take some medication for symptomatic relief on that day that they become ill," Schaffner said.

    He said people who are looking for fever relief after their vaccination could turn to acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol.

    Offit is encouraging people to let their bodies heal without self-medicating, if possible.

    "Stay hydrated, lay down, don't stress yourself out. I mean you can put down heating pads if you're sore, if your muscles are sore, but I don't think you need to take a medicine," he said. "Even though we are compelled to pop medicines, I don't think you need to do that here."

    Dr. Leo Nissola, an immunotherapy scientist and adviser to the nonprofit COVID Act Now, offered similar advice in an interview on CBSN.

    "Pre-medicating is not something that we recommend. I think we live in a nation that medicates to an extent that it is absurd. We need to acknowledge that. We also need to acknowledge the fact that not every single pain you have, you must take a pill for it," he said. "If you are experiencing a side effect from the vaccine, you should talk to your doctor and he or she should medicate you. ... But again, self-medicating is never a smart choice."

    Schaffner and Offit described different personal experiences when they got the vaccines themselves.

    Offit had received his second vaccine dose 10 days prior, and said, "I can tell you my second dose was not fun." For two days he experienced symptoms including a fever of 101 degrees, joint pain and fatigue — but said he "hung in there" and is "better for it."

    Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses several weeks apart, and while reactions to the first dose are not as common, Offit warned based on his own experience that they can occur.

    "I had about 10 hours of low-grade fever and fatigue, but the fatigue was significant. I hadn't ever experienced this level of fatigue before in my life. I felt like I was under water," he said.

    Schaffner, who also received both doses, only reported "a tender arm" as a side effect — which he described as less impactful than the "sore arm" he would associate with the flu vaccine.

    "When I get flu vaccine I actually get a sore arm — when I move my arm I feel it," he said. "Here I didn't, but if I actually touched the inoculation site, it was a little bit tender. And that lasted for two days, on both occasions."

    Don't take painkillers before your COVID-19 shot, doctors advise (msn.com)
     

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    #2467 Sir iAco, Jan 29, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2021
  8. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Not sure what ABS-CBN and GMA7's vaccination plans are... But we really need our "media and sports personalities" vaccinated in public to gain trust

    PBA partners with Red Cross for vaccination program | Philstar
     
  9. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Germany purchases 200K doses of COVID-19 treatment given to Trump
    Zack Budryk
    Germany purchases 200K doses of COVID-19 treatment given to Trump (msn.com)

    [​IMG]Germany purchases 200K doses of COVID-19 treatment given to Trump
    German officials have reportedly bought 200,000 doses of the antibody treatment used to treat then-President Trump when he was hospitalized with the coronavirus in the fall.

    [​IMG]© Getty Images Germany purchases 200K doses of COVID-19 treatment given to Trump

    Health Minister Jens Spahn said the $487 million purchase will make Germany the first European Union member to use the monoclonal antibody treatment, Bloomberg reported.

    "The injection of these antibodies can help prevent patients at risk in the early phase from developing a serious condition," Spahn told the German tabloid Bild, according to Bloomberg.

    The announcement comes as Germany has lagged behind its goals for the rollout of vaccinations for the virus. Under 2 percent of Germans have been vaccinated thus far, the news outlet noted, citing data from the Robert Koch Institute.

    The therapy was used to treat Trump last year after he was taken to Walter Reed Hospital near Washington, D.C. Upon recovery, Trump called the antibody treatment a "blessing from God" and called for it to be made available to all Americans free. No action was ultimately taken to distribute it free, however.

    Last week, Eli Lilly said that its version of the treatment significantly reduced the risk of infection in a clinical trial among nursing home residents and staff.

    "These data strengthen our conviction that monoclonal antibodies such as bamlanivimab can play a critical role in turning the tide of this pandemic," Chief Scientific Officer Daniel Skovronsky said in a statement, adding that the company was "explor[ing] expanding the emergency use authorization" for the therapy with the Food and Drug Administration.

    Germany, hailed as one of western Europe's success stories in the first wave of the virus, has seen a recent resurgence, like much of the rest of the world. As of Monday, the country has 2.15 million cases of the virus and 52,297 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

    Germany purchases 200K doses of COVID-19 treatment given to Trump (msn.com)
     

    Attached Files:

  10. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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  11. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Johnson & Johnson Releases Single-Dose Vaccine Results
    Zachary Evans
    Fri, January 29, 2021
    Johnson & Johnson Releases Single-Dose Vaccine Results (yahoo.com)
    [​IMG]
    Johnson & Johnson announced on Friday that its coronavirus vaccine was 72 percent effective against the pathogen in the U.S., and the company will ask federal regulators for approval in February.

    Unlike the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna candidates, Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine is administered in one shot. The vaccine uses a relatively new technology to deliver a coronavirus gene into the body by using a modified form of the common cold. The gene instructs bodily cells to make a protein similar to coronavirus, which wards off infection.

    While the vaccine is not as effective as those of Pfizer and Moderna, Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine is still strong enough to give widespread protection from coronavirus. The company has the ability to ship millions of doses, and a February approval would add the vaccine to the tools currently being used to fight the pandemic.

    While the vaccine’s efficacy rate was 72 percent in the U.S., that rate dropped to 57 percent in trials in South Africa, where a new variant of coronavirus is spreading. The variant, labeled B.1.351, has also been found to slightly reduce the efficacy of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. Concern over the variant prompted the Biden administration to impose a travel ban from South Africa earlier this week.
    Johnson & Johnson Releases Single-Dose Vaccine Results (yahoo.com)
     
  12. Pupkin

    Pupkin Well-Known Member

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    The worst part of that story is many Pilipino's believe it's so. And they are not going to take the Vaccines once available.

    Meanwhile this is not a fake news. Starting February 1 MetroManila and other part of the country will be going back to GCQ because of sudden increase of infections.

    While other countries especially in Asia the infection rate goes down significantly even in United States the trend is going down.

    I read on Reddit some folks there calling the Philippines sick man of Asia.

    I don’t know what’s happening anymore to this country.

    Are we that hard headed not to realize and see the actuality? or we just don’t care anymore? ..from adults to young adults to teens. What a generation.
     
  13. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Which Covid Vaccine Should You Get? Experts Cite the Effect Against Severe Disease

    Infectious disease doctors say getting a shot of the J&J vaccine, which has a lower efficacy against the virus than other vaccines, would still be well worthwhile.

    [​IMG]
    Covid vaccinations in Santa Barbara County, Calif., this week.Credit...Daniel Dreifuss for The New York Times
    Which Covid Vaccine Should You Get? Experts Weigh the Effect Against Severe Disease - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
    By Denise Grady
    Jan. 29, 2021

    At first glance, the results reported on Friday from the long-awaited trial of Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine might have seemed disappointing. Its overall efficacy — the ability to prevent moderate and severe disease — was reported at 72 percent in the United States, 66 percent in Latin American countries and 57 percent in South Africa.

    Those figures appear far below the high bar set by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, the first two vaccines authorized for emergency use in the United States, which reported overall efficacy from 94 to 95 percent.

    Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert and now the lead medical adviser to President Biden on the coronavirus pandemic, acknowledged the striking difference at a briefing on Friday.

    “If you woke up and you say, ‘Well, go to the door on the left and you get 94 or 95 percent, go to the door on the right and you get 72 percent,’ which door do you want to go to?” he asked.

    But Dr. Fauci said that the more crucial measure was the ability to prevent severe disease, which translates to keeping people out of the hospital and preventing deaths. And that result, for Johnson & Johnson, was 85 percent in all of the countries where it was tested, including South Africa, where a rapidly spreading variant of the virus had shown some ability to elude vaccines.

    More important than preventing “some aches and a sore throat,” Dr. Fauci said, is to fend off severe disease, especially in people with underlying conditions and in older adults, who are more likely to become seriously ill and to die from Covid-19.

    “If you can prevent severe disease in a high percentage of individuals, that will alleviate so much of the stress in human suffering and death in this epidemic that we’re seeing, particularly now,” Dr. Fauci said, “as we well know, over the last several weeks, our health care system has been stressed by the number of people that require hospitalization, as well as intensive care.”

    Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, compared the ability to prevent severe disease to the effects of flu shots, which do not always prevent influenza entirely but can make it less severe.

    “The same thing seems to be applying here, in a circumstance where this variant is clearly making it a little tougher to get the most vigorous response that you would want to have,” Dr. Collins said. “But still, for severe disease, it’s looking really good.”

    The Moderna vaccine also showed high efficacy, 100 percent, against severe disease. The Pfizer-BioNTech one appeared to as well, but the overall number of severe cases in the study was too small to be sure.

    But researchers warn that trying to compare effectiveness between new studies and earlier ones may be misleading, because the virus is evolving quickly and to some extent the trials have studied different pathogens.

    [​IMG]
    A participant in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial in Cape Town, South Africa, last month.Credit...Joao Silva/The New York Times

    “You have to recognize that Pfizer and Moderna had an advantage,” Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University, said in an interview. “They did their clinical trials before the variant strains became very apparent. Johnson & Johnson was testing its vaccine not only against the standard strain but they had the variants.”

    The best way to stop the spread of mutants and to prevent more new ones from emerging is to vaccinate as many people as quickly as possible, Dr. Fauci and other researchers say. Viruses cannot mutate unless they are replicating, and they cannot replicate unless they can get into cells. Keeping them out by immunizing people can shut down the process.

    In addition to the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines already in use in the United States, three more may soon become available: those made by Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca. AstraZeneca’s vaccine has already been authorized in Britain and other countries.

    Globally, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is expected to play an important role, especially in low and middle-income countries, because it works after just one shot, is relatively inexpensive and is easier to store and distribute than the vaccines made by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna since it does not share their stringent requirements for freezing and refrigerating.

    People waiting to be vaccinated may wonder if they will be able to pick and choose among vaccines, and if they should hold out and wait until the one that looks best to them becomes available.

    Dr. Paul Offit, a vaccine expert at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, told CNN that if there was an abundant supply of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, they would be his first choices because of their higher overall efficacy.

    [​IMG]
    Answers to All Your Questions About Getting Vaccinated for Covid-19
    Times reporters answered questions from readers about getting the vaccine, what to expect and what happens next.

    But for now, there is not enough of those vaccines.

    If he could not get either the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine or the Moderna one, he would take the Johnson & Johnson shot, Dr. Offit said — as long as the data that the company will be presenting to the Food and Drug Administration looks as good as what the company reported on Friday.

    He said Johnson & Johnson’s report of the reduction in severe disease was a powerful selling point.

    “That’s what you want,” Dr. Offit said. “You want to stay out of the hospital, and stay out of the morgue.”

    He noted that the company was also studying a two-shot regimen, which might raise its efficacy.

    People who take the Johnson & Johnson vaccine should be able to safely receive a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine later if a booster shot is needed, he said.

    Dr. Schaffner said he had just attended a meeting with other public health experts, and they had asked one another what they would tell their spouses or partners to do if they could get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine tomorrow, or had to wait three weeks for Pfizer-BioNTech’s or Moderna’s.

    “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” Dr. Schaffner said. “The virus is bad. You’re risking three more weeks of exposure as opposed to getting protection tomorrow.”

    He said Johnson & Johnson’s 85 percent efficacy against severe disease was a bit lower than those reported by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech, “but it’s still pretty darn high.”

    It is not yet known whether it would be safe to take one type of vaccine now and then another later, Dr. Schaffner said, adding, “We haven’t studied this.”

    The Latest Vaccine Coverage
    Amid Critical Shortage, E.U. Moves to Limit Vaccine Exports
    Jan. 29, 2021

    Johnson & Johnson’s Vaccine Offers Strong Protection but Fuels Concern About Variants
    Jan. 29, 2021

    As Virus Grows Stealthier, Vaccine Makers Reconsider Battle Plans
    Jan. 25, 2021

    Novavax’s Vaccine Works Well — Except on Variant First Found in South Africa
    Jan. 28, 2021


    Denise Grady has been a science reporter for The Times since 1998. She wrote “Deadly Invaders,” a book about emerging viruses. @nytDeniseGrady

    A version of this article appears in print on Jan. 30, 2021, Section A, Page 6 of the New York edition with the headline: Which Version Is Best? Anything You Can Get To Limit Severe Illness. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper |

    Which Covid Vaccine Should You Get? Experts Weigh the Effect Against Severe Disease - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
     
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  14. jetan

    jetan PhilMUG Addict Member

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    were still on GCQ.
     
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  15. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    See Which Country Is Leading the Global Race to Vaccinate
    By Lauren Leather
    Jan. 25, 2021

    Folks, copy and paste cannot capture the full article. To read more and have a better appreciation of the graphics, please go here.

    About 30 percent of Israelis have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, a rate that outpaces any other country. The United States is far behind, with about 6 percent of residents having received a vaccine dose, and countries in the European Union are off to an even slower start.

    Share of each nation’s population that has received at least one vaccine dose

    [​IMG]

    The data on countries with a current vaccination campaign was compiled from government sources by Our World in Data. Many countries, particularly those in the developing world, where governments have struggled to procure vaccines, are not yet vaccinating residents at all.

    Most countries are using vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna, both of which require two doses. Two of the countries with among the world’s highest vaccination rates, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, are also using a vaccine developed by the Chinese company Sinopharm, which has not been approved for use in the United States or the Europe Union.

    Source: Which Country is Leading the Race to Vaccinate? - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
     
  16. Pupkin

    Pupkin Well-Known Member

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    Were in MGCQ before but starting today were Back to GCQ.
     
  17. iAmMichael05

    iAmMichael05 Active Member

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    As far as I know, we've never been under MGCQ. It's been GCQ all this time.
     
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  18. Quest4dgoodlife

    Quest4dgoodlife Active Member

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    October - GCQ
    https://www.rappler.com/nation/coronavirus-quarantine-restrictions-october-2020

    November - GCQ
    Metro Manila under GCQ until November 30
    https://www.rappler.com/nation/metro-manila-under-gcq-november-30-2020

    December - GCQ
    President Rodrigo Roa Duterte earlier retained Metro Manila under general community quarantine (GCQ) from Dec. 1 to 31.
    https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1125277

    January - GCQ
    Metro Manila is under GCQ until January 31.
    https://www.manilatimes.net/2021/01...nila-mayors-to-iatf-retain-gcq-in-feb/833705/
    ----

    I live in BGC, I just shake my head at the number of people I see going out last month and this month. It's as if there's no pandemic. Maybe it's fatigue, 13th month bonus, holidays, etc.

    On one hand, it's good to see people spending and keeping businesses afloat but a lot of people are going about it in an irresponsible manner. Passed by elephant grounds one time and the whole place was packed (the mere sight would make you doubt they were at the allowed 50% capacity), saw Starbucks with people studying and socializing as well, arabica with snaking lines outside (with the crowds not practicing safe social distancing with friends clustering together). A lot more examples I see when driving around BGC, but c'mon people there's still a pandemic going on.
     
    raypin and Pupkin like this.
  19. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    mm...last night, my neighbors held a drinking party with dozens of guests. No masks. No social distancing. Free- flowing liquor. Disgusting.
     
    Quest4dgoodlife and Godfather like this.
  20. tinmuning

    tinmuning Active Member

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    We live in Makati and the crowd in BGC High Street is a stark contrast to the ones here even in the mall. There were kids (sans mask) and pets running around--pretty much the same crowd pre-pandemic. Saw some guards talking to establishment representatives re: social distancing especially when they see tables with seatings located near each other but no one's controlling the crowd in the grass area.
     

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