Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

Discussion in 'General OT' started by imart, Jan 28, 2020.

  1. Silentwill

    Silentwill Active Member

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    So I was tagged covid suspect wehn I wentfor a check up after a week of mild fever abd heavy cough and cold. I just had a dreaded swab test and I was suprised the swab seemed to be shorter than what I was expecting and didn't hurt or feel that mubh uncomfortable despite ne havibg sensitive nose that oinching it would usually trigger bad case of cold. Are they using shorter swabs now, or may be I didn't get a good look because I actually wanted not to see it.
     
  2. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Mm...London in strict lockdown again following the discovery of new mutations of the virus that are 70% more transmissible. Good explainer:

    https://fb.watch/2AyOvXg0kv/
     
  3. Silentwill

    Silentwill Active Member

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    I tested negative for Sars-Cov2 virus. What's curious though was, before I was able to go back to the hospital to get my result, I received a call and was expecting they may be giving me the result over the phone. Instead, the caller asked me for the result. They also asked me some info about the other members of the household. I guess when you get tested for swab test, the hospital forwards your information to the government for contact tracing.
     
    #2383 Silentwill, Dec 26, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
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  4. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    was thinking of a "Vaccine" thread for all updates...

    And to see how many members here are thinking of getting it once it's available

    ***
    I was in the office pantry last week and heard our "management" talking about the vaccine...

    It turns out that they have already an agreement with a specific manufacturer to supply the vaccine once approved by local authorities.

    They were actually complaining about our country which requires a 1 to 1 donation for every dose privately purchased. (donation goes to the Gov't)
     
    #2384 ice, Dec 30, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2020
  5. tinmuning

    tinmuning Active Member

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    A separate thread for Covid-19 vaccine seems a good idea @ice as one brand alone may involve a lengthy discussion.

    As an employer, I am interested to have not only my immediate family vaccinated but also our employees. We had everyone vaccinated for flu each year then pneumonia this 2020. Whatever that would keep everyone healthy and productive, we're willing to do it.
     
  6. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Times Square a ghost town on New Year’s Eve
    It’s Times Square on New Year’s Eve like you’ve never seen it before.

    The Crossroads of the World turned into an eerie ghost town on Thursday, as officials closed off the area to revelers because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

    or the first time in 114 years, the New Year’s Eve spectacular in Times Square will be held without a live audience.

    Times Square a ghost town on New Year's Eve (nypost.com)


    Happy New Year to all on Philmug !!!

    [​IMG]
     
    #2386 Sir iAco, Jan 1, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2021
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  7. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Vaccine:

    PH seeks $300-M World Bank loan to buy COVID vaccines | Inquirer.net

    Manileños sign up for free shots promised by city hall | Inquirer.net

    ***
    Philippines approves clinical trial for Janssen's Covid-19 vaccine | The Straits Times

    ^I honestly find it strange that Janssen is the first vaccine to be tested locally... Although I personally have no idea how a country is chosen for testing.

    ***
    Lastly, was looking at the list of "approved/authorized" vaccines.

    I guess the guys at FDA is still on holiday break as its weird that not even a single vaccine is approved for local use.
     
  8. Kingmaker

    Kingmaker Active Member

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    This is scary chapter of the virus if proven to be true:

    “We now have high confidence that this variant does have a transmission advantage over other virus variants that are currently in the UK,” said Peter Horby, a professor of emerging infectious diseases at Oxford University and chair of NERVTAG.

    “There is a hint that it has a higher propensity to infect children,” said Neil Ferguson, a professor and infectious disease epidemiologist at Imperial College London and also a member of NERVTAG.

    “We haven’t established any sort of causality on that, but we can see it in the data,” Ferguson said. “We will need to gather more data to see how it behaves going forward.”
    ........................

    "Wendy Barclay, another NERVTAG professor and a specialist in virology at Imperial, said that among the mutations in the new variant are changes to the way it enters human cells, which may mean “that children are, perhaps, equally susceptible to this virus as adults”.

    “Therefore, given their mixing patterns, you would expect to see more children being infected,” Barclay said."


    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-variant-children-idUKKBN28V2F5
     
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  9. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Alcohol can reduce the effectiveness of COVID vaccine, experts say
    By Lee Brown
    Alcohol can reduce effectiveness of COVID vaccine: experts (nypost.com)
    January 4, 2021 | 2:04pm | Updated January 4, 2021 | 2:05pm

    This is sobering news.

    Drinking alcohol can reduce the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, according to UK experts.

    In a new BBC documentary set to air Wednesday, medics evaluated changes to the immune system caused by boozing, Metro UK said.

    They found that even three glasses of Prosecco halved the levels of white blood cells like lymphocytes that are crucial in creating antibodies to attack viruses, the report said.

    “You need to have your immune system working tip-top to have a good response to the vaccine, so if you’re drinking the night before, or shortly afterward, that’s not going to help,” University of Manchester professor Sheena Cruickshank told the paper.

    Cruickshank advised people to avoid drinking in the days around getting vaccinated.

    Meanwhile, in vodka-loving Russia, officials have been even stricter — telling citizens to avoid booze for two months after getting jabbed.

    Alcohol can reduce effectiveness of COVID vaccine: experts (nypost.com)
     
  10. dasaint

    dasaint PhilMUG Addict Member

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  11. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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    I shared an article earlier that Russian authorities have informed people not to mix Alcohol and Sputnik V :)

    Issue I can see here is Moderna, as they are presently planning to have a 12 weeks gap between doses.
     
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  12. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    COVID Ball Drop

    [​IMG]

    Hope everyone is safe and fine as we look ahead to what comes next.


    [​IMG]
     
    #2392 Sir iAco, Jan 6, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2021
  13. Sir iAco

    Sir iAco PhilMUG Addict Member
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    Blood Plasma Reduces Risk of Severe Covid-19 if Given Early
    Thousands of people received convalescent plasma as an experimental treatment for Covid. A new study shows that it works — but only when given within a few days of the onset of illness.

    By Katherine J. Wu
    Jan. 6, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

    A small but rigorous clinical trial in Argentina has found that blood plasma from recovered Covid-19 patients can keep older adults from getting seriously sick with the coronavirus — if they get the therapy within days of the onset of the illness.

    The results, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, are some of the first to conclusively point toward the oft-discussed treatment’s beneficial effects. They arrive nearly five months after the Food and Drug Administration, under pressure from President Trump, issued the therapy an emergency green light for use in people hospitalized with Covid-19.

    Thousands of patients have received infusions of plasma in the months since, while researchers waited for the data. The new study is one of the first well-designed clinical trials to show that the therapy has some benefit. “That’s kind of what we have been looking for, in terms of really having evidence,” said Dr. Boghuma Kabisen Titanji, an infectious disease physician at Emory University who wasn’t involved in the research.

    Convalescent plasma, the pale yellow liquid left over after blood is stripped of its red and white cells, teems with disease-fighting molecules called antibodies. Last summer, Mr. Trump hailed it as “a powerful therapy” made possible “by marshaling the full power of the federal government.”

    But the F.D.A.’s controversial stamp of approval, granted on Aug. 23, was met with widespread criticism from researchers and health care professionals, many of whom decried the decision as political and lacking in scientific support.

    At the time of the emergency authorization, scant evidence pointed to the possibility that blood plasma might help people fight off the coronavirus. The treatment’s benefits also seemed largely limited to patients who received their infusions within three days of diagnosis and hadn’t yet experienced severe symptoms.

    The new study, led by Dr. Fernando Polack, a pediatric infectious disease physician and the scientific director of the INFANT Foundation in Argentina, appears to clarify the circumstances under which plasma has its perks.

    In 80 people, an infusion of plasma decreased the risk of developing a severe case of Covid by 48 percent, compared with another group of 80 who received a saline solution instead, the study found. But the study’s parameters were strict: Everyone enrolled in the trial was at least 65 years old — a group known to be at higher risk of falling seriously ill. About half of the participants also had health conditions that made them more vulnerable to the virus. And the plasma therapy, which was screened to ensure it contained high levels of antibodies, was always given within three days of when the patients started to feel symptoms.

    “We went as early as we could,” Dr. Polack said. Administering the therapy too late in the course of disease, he said, is akin to allowing a burglar to ransack a home for hours before deciding to call the police. An early dose, on the other hand, has the potential to nip a blooming infection in the bud.

    “I think it’s becoming clear now that the earlier you catch this infection, the more likely you are to stave off disease,” said Dr. Taia Wang, an immunologist at Stanford University who wasn’t involved in the study.

    Other trials testing convalescent plasma’s effects in sicker patients have flopped, finding that the therapy did little to hasten recovery or prevent death — contradicting the treatment’s emergency authorization, which specifies use in hospitalized people.

    Treatment guidelines published by the National Institutes of Health do not recommend for or against use of convalescent plasma, because of a paucity of data.

    “I think this really validates a lot of what observational studies and clinical experience has been showing,” said Dr. Liise-anne Pirofski, a physician and immunologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center who has led trials studying convalescent plasma, but wasn’t involved in the new study.

    [​IMG]
    Image[​IMG]
    Donated plasma in bags at a donation center in Krakow, Poland.Credit...Omar Marques/Getty Images
    Some experts pointed out that the benefits of convalescent plasma may be difficult to study and capitalize on, since most people’s illnesses are too far along by the time they seek medical care.

    It will be difficult “to find and diagnose them within that vanishingly small window,” said Dr. Ilan Schwartz, an infectious disease physician at the University of Alberta who wasn’t involved in the study. “The study looks solid, but not necessarily practical in the real world.”

    Plasma has additional logistical hurdles, Dr. Titanji, of Emory University, said. The treatment is given as an intravenous infusion — a process that requires skilled hands — and patients need to be monitored afterward. That might be easier in long-term care facilities, but far tougher to accomplish for the general population, she said.

    And plasma may not work as well as monoclonal antibody therapy — a synthetic concoction that’s manufactured en masse in the lab, rather than drawn from people’s blood, and focuses on just one or two types of antibodies at a time, instead of the entire slew produced naturally by the immune system. Two types of monoclonal antibody treatments have been authorized for emergency use in Covid patients.

    But plasma does have some advantages over monoclonal antibody treatments, Dr. Polack pointed out.

    Because monoclonal antibodies are synthetic and laborious to make, they carry a hefty price tag, sometimes costing thousands of dollars (although the U.S. government has paid for some doses upfront). The treatment’s limited supply chain, as well as unexpectedly low demand, has kept it out of the reach of many patients in need in the United States and abroad.

    In countries like Argentina, plasma might be one of the best treatment options available, Dr. Polack said. Plasma infusions in Buenos Aires, he said, cost less than $200 a patient. “It’s more accessible, more inexpensive, more universal,” he said.

    Even in the United States, plasma “is really the only game in town that’s broadly available in terms of antibody therapies,” Dr. Wang, of Stanford, said.

    Rather than viewing monoclonal antibodies as an upgrade to convalescent plasma, “they each have a different place in the armamentarium,” Dr. Pirofski said. “Anything that has the capacity to control this virus is really an unbelievable advantage at this point.”

    Source: Study Says Blood Plasma Reduces Risk of Severe Covid-19 if Given Early - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

    Katherine J. Wu is a reporter covering science and health. She holds a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunobiology from Harvard University. @KatherineJWu
     
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  14. ice

    ice PhilMUG Addict Member

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  15. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    mmm....I read that Thailand is now manufacturing the Astra Zeneca or UK vaccine. Buti pa sila.
     
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  16. shaft

    shaft Well-Known Member

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  17. Pupkin

    Pupkin Well-Known Member

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    It is looking like the Philippine Government has no Clear reserves of Vaccines for us. If this goes up to March and still there’s no Answer from this Government i’m no longer waiting. I will go ahead and start looking for Vaccine from Private sectors. I hope the government will let us do that.
     
  18. tinmuning

    tinmuning Active Member

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    @Pupkin Private sectors are allowed to purchase vaccines through the govt on the condition that they would donate half of the number of total orders to the govt. I don't know what the minimum required order though.
     
    #2398 tinmuning, Jan 9, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
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  19. jon1432000

    jon1432000 Member

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  20. raypin

    raypin PhilMUG Addict Member

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    Mm....remove the 50% donation requirememt from private procurement of vaccines. Private funds na nga, nanakawin pa ng gobyerno ng kalahati. Disincentive to procure lang yan. It doubles the cost to the private sector. Dumbshit idea.
     
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